Tag-Archive for » Artificial Reefs «

October 06th, 2012 | Author:

Runners and Walkers,
Whether you are as fast as a Spotted Eagle Ray or move like a Loggerhead Turtle out of water, this event is for you. Not only will this be a fun race down Gulf Blvd on Navarre Beach with an awards party on the gulf at the Navarre Beach Pier, this is an opportunity to help the local environment in an unprecedented way. Sign up today and beat the early race registration cut-off.

5k Run/Walk & 1 Mile Fun Run
Saturday – October 13th 2012 7:30am Start

Help the Navarre Beach Chamber Foundation maintain our near shore Marine Sanctuaries and Artificial Reefs for Snorkeling and Diving in Santa Rosa Sound and Navarre Beach

Register online at www.active.com
or
Download registration form at www.navarrebeachmarinesanctuary.com

(Registration Drop Off – Navarre Chamber/Visitor Information Center)

AWARDS CEREMONY & PARTY @ NAVARRE PIER

For more Information on the 5K or the Marine Sanctuary project
email navbms@navarrebeachmarinesanctuary.com
or visit our website

MAKE NAVARRE SNORKELICIOUS!

Navarre Beach Area Chamber of Commerce Foundation is a 501c3 non-profit organization
We apologize if you have received this email more than once

4th Annual Run for the Reef
The Navarre Pier will be the venue for the 4th Annual Run for the Reef on Saturday, October 13th, 2012 at 7:30 am. This 5K run/walk and one mile fun run will benefit the Marine Sanctuary project which includes snorkeling and diving reefs off Navarre Beach and have a significant impact on our local economy and environment.
Register online at active.com or find more information and download a registration form at navarrebeachmarinesanctuary.com. Registration forms are also available at the Navarre Beach Pier and the Navarre Visitor Information Center. Race day registration will be 6 am on the Pier deck. Awards and refreshments after the race, enjoy the run and the beautiful gulf front view from the Navarre Pier Deck.

August 07th, 2011 | Author:

A new  University of Florida study finds artificial reefs are economic boon and  enjoy widespread public support.   The study of artificial reef use in six southwest Florida counties shows the structures lure a lot more than fish.

The reefs, which provide habitat for popular sport fish and other marine life, pulled more than $253 million into the region during one year, the study found. Though it costs nothing more than a saltwater fishing license to use the submerged structures as a fishing spot, anglers spend money on food, lodging, fuel, tackle and other necessities.

The UF and Florida Sea Grant study looked at money generated by artificial reefs in Pinellas, Hillsborough, Manatee, Sarasota, Charlotte and Lee counties in 2009. Researchers found that $136 million came from residents, while $117 million was spent by visitors.

Download the study here.

January 31st, 2011 | Author:

Santa Rosa County is gathering information via a survey to help determine the public’s desire for improvements to the Navarre County Beach Park via a land use grant. We encourage you to take the survey and express your desire for beach accessible artificial reefs and the snorkeling and diving opportunities that they provide.

September 29th, 2010 | Author:

A new reef project at the east end of Pensacola Beach in the Gulf of Mexico is expected to pay big dividends for the diving and tourist industry devastated by the oil spill.

In the next few weeks crews will drop 19 pairs of artificial reefs offshore just east of Portofino which is expected to bring droves of snorkelers and divers.  Check out the WEAR Channel 3 report on what it means to the area.

The Navarre Beach Marine Sanctuary is establishing the same kind of reef system on Navarre Beach in both the Gulf of Mexico and in the Santa Rosa Sound.  Together with a new effort to bring a similar reef system to Perdido Key, we can establish a Snorkeling trail that will provide a great amenity to residents and visitors.

February 23rd, 2010 | Author:

Pensacola area reefing effort is also moving ahead.   Officials are hoping to install three reefs per this Pensacola News Journal Article

From: Kimberly Blair o kblair@pnj.com  on February 11, 2010
Snorkels, masks and fins may soon become as essential to a day on Pensacola Beach as sunscreen and boogie boards.
A proposal to install three near-shore snorkeling reefs is in the works, according to W.A. “Buck” Lee, executive director of the Santa Rosa Island Authority, and Robert Turpin, manager of Escambia’s Marine Resources Division.
One of the reefs would be located a couple hundred feet into the Gulf of Mexico near Park East, east of the Portofino towers. The piling-style reef would be geared for experienced snorkelers
Two pyramid-style reefs would be located in Pensacola Bay near Park West at the entrance to the Gulf Islands National Seashore. The one closest to shore would be geared for children and novices, and one about 500 feet farther out would be for fishing and diving.
The three projects hinge on securing permits from a number of federal agencies, Turpin said.
The biggest hurdle is getting the National Marine Fisheries Service to sign off on the permits because the reefs are proposed in the critical Gulf sturgeon habitat, he said.
The county currently has 198 artificial reefs, including the largest in the world – the decommissioned aircraft carrier Oriskany. But, unlike the three proposed reefs, they’re accessible only by boat.
The goal of the snorkeling reefs is to generate more money for Pensacola Beach by providing tourists with more to do so they extend their vacations, Lee said.
Beverly McCay, general manager of Holiday Inn Express on Pensacola Beach near Park West, said guests often ask where’s the best place to snorkel or beach dive.
“Anything that enhances the vacation experience can extend the tourist’s stay,” McCay said. “Some tourists who come on a weekend may see that there’s so much to do and then decide to come back and spend a week.”
Randy Larcom of Bay Breeze Aquatics & Dive Center in Gulf Breeze said people call on a regular basis looking for snorkeling opportunities.
“Right now about the only place we can send anybody is Fort Pickens, but it’s not the best place to snorkel,” he said of the popular scuba-diving spot.
That’s because snorkelers have to compete with divers and fight strong currents at the mouth of Pensacola Pass, off Fort Pickens.
“Anything that can be made for tourists in shallow enough water would be a big help,” Larcom said.
His business, he said, would benefit by renting snorkeling equipment to people who could enjoy watching a variety of fish, such as snapper, grouper, flounder and trigger fish around the reefs. The three projects hinge on securing permits from a number of federal agencies, Turpin said.
The biggest hurdle is getting the National Marine Fisheries Service to sign off on the permits because the reefs are proposed in the critical Gulf sturgeon habitat, he said.
The county currently has 198 artificial reefs, including the largest in the world – the decommissioned aircraft carrier Oriskany. But, unlike the three proposed reefs, they’re accessible only by boat.
The goal of the snorkeling reefs is to generate more money for Pensacola Beach by providing tourists with more to do so they extend their vacations, Lee said.
Beverly McCay, general manager of Holiday Inn Express on Pensacola Beach near Park West, said guests often ask where’s the best place to snorkel or beach dive.
“Anything that enhances the vacation experience can extend the tourist’s stay,” McCay said. “Some tourists who come on a weekend may see that there’s so much to do and then decide to come back and spend a week.”
Randy Larcom of Bay Breeze Aquatics & Dive Center in Gulf Breeze said people call on a regular basis looking for snorkeling opportunities.
“Right now about the only place we can send anybody is Fort Pickens, but it’s not the best place to snorkel,” he said of the popular scuba-diving spot.
That’s because snorkelers have to compete with divers and fight strong currents at the mouth of Pensacola Pass, off Fort Pickens.
“Anything that can be made for tourists in shallow enough water would be a big help,” Larcom said.
His business, he said, would benefit by renting snorkeling equipment to people who could enjoy watching a variety of fish, such as snapper, grouper, flounder and trigger fish around the reefs.
Snorkelers now mostly hunt shells and sand dollars and, if they’re lucky, catch glimpses of fleeting fish.
Keith Wilkins, Escambia’s deputy chief for neighborhood and community services, said Escambia County bed taxes would pay for the reefs.
An exact dollar amount has not been calculated, but reefs are not expensive, he said.
“A small reef is about $10,000,” he said. “These projects may be a little more.”

Snorkelers could get place to kick their fins

Officials hoping to install three reefs

Kimberly Blair • kblair@pnj.com • February 11, 2010

Snorkels, masks and fins may soon become as essential to a day on Pensacola Beach as sunscreen and boogie boards.

A proposal to install three near-shore snorkeling reefs is in the works, according to W.A. “Buck” Lee, executive director of the Santa Rosa Island Authority, and Robert Turpin, manager of Escambia’s Marine Resources Division.

One of the reefs would be located a couple hundred feet into the Gulf of Mexico near Park East, east of the Portofino towers. The piling-style reef would be geared for experienced snorkelers

Two pyramid-style reefs would be located in Pensacola Bay near Park West at the entrance to the Gulf Islands National Seashore. The one closest to shore would be geared for children and novices, and one about 500 feet farther out would be for fishing and diving.

The three projects hinge on securing permits from a number of federal agencies, Turpin said.

The biggest hurdle is getting the National Marine Fisheries Service to sign off on the permits because the reefs are proposed in the critical Gulf sturgeon habitat, he said.

The county currently has 198 artificial reefs, including the largest in the world — the decommissioned aircraft carrier Oriskany. But, unlike the three proposed reefs, they’re accessible only by boat.

The goal of the snorkeling reefs is to generate more money for Pensacola Beach by providing tourists with more to do so they extend their vacations, Lee said.

Beverly McCay, general manager of Holiday Inn Express on Pensacola Beach near Park West, said guests often ask where’s the best place to snorkel or beach dive.

“Anything that enhances the vacation experience can extend the tourist’s stay,” McCay said. “Some tourists who come on a weekend may see that there’s so much to do and then decide to come back and spend a week.”

Randy Larcom of Bay Breeze Aquatics & Dive Center in Gulf Breeze said people call on a regular basis looking for snorkeling opportunities.

“Right now about the only place we can send anybody is Fort Pickens, but it’s not the best place to snorkel,” he said of the popular scuba-diving spot.

That’s because snorkelers have to compete with divers and fight strong currents at the mouth of Pensacola Pass, off Fort Pickens.

“Anything that can be made for tourists in shallow enough water would be a big help,” Larcom said.

His business, he said, would benefit by renting snorkeling equipment to people who could enjoy watching a variety of fish, such as snapper, grouper, flounder and trigger fish around the reefs. The three projects hinge on securing permits from a number of federal agencies, Turpin said.

The biggest hurdle is getting the National Marine Fisheries Service to sign off on the permits because the reefs are proposed in the critical Gulf sturgeon habitat, he said.

The county currently has 198 artificial reefs, including the largest in the world — the decommissioned aircraft carrier Oriskany. But, unlike the three proposed reefs, they’re accessible only by boat.

The goal of the snorkeling reefs is to generate more money for Pensacola Beach by providing tourists with more to do so they extend their vacations, Lee said.

Beverly McCay, general manager of Holiday Inn Express on Pensacola Beach near Park West, said guests often ask where’s the best place to snorkel or beach dive.

“Anything that enhances the vacation experience can extend the tourist’s stay,” McCay said. “Some tourists who come on a weekend may see that there’s so much to do and then decide to come back and spend a week.”

Randy Larcom of Bay Breeze Aquatics & Dive Center in Gulf Breeze said people call on a regular basis looking for snorkeling opportunities.

“Right now about the only place we can send anybody is Fort Pickens, but it’s not the best place to snorkel,” he said of the popular scuba-diving spot.

That’s because snorkelers have to compete with divers and fight strong currents at the mouth of Pensacola Pass, off Fort Pickens.

“Anything that can be made for tourists in shallow enough water would be a big help,” Larcom said.

His business, he said, would benefit by renting snorkeling equipment to people who could enjoy watching a variety of fish, such as snapper, grouper, flounder and trigger fish around the reefs.

Snorkelers now mostly hunt shells and sand dollars and, if they’re lucky, catch glimpses of fleeting fish.

Keith Wilkins, Escambia’s deputy chief for neighborhood and community services, said Escambia County bed taxes would pay for the reefs.

An exact dollar amount has not been calculated, but reefs are not expensive, he said.

“A small reef is about $10,000,” he said. “These projects may be a little more.”

June 23rd, 2009 | Author:

Mike Sandler found this neat informational nugget.

Electrified artificial reef moves forward

The Associated Press 22 June 2009

LAUDERDALE-BY-THE-SEA, Fla. — A federal agency is giving the green light to a proposal to install an electrified artificial reef on the ocean floor.

The Army Corps of Engineers says the town can work with Global Coral Reef Alliance to install a $65,000 cluster of metal structures that would use a low-voltage current to stimulate the growth of corals, creating habitat for fish and other marine creatures.

The group has built artificial reefs in several other countries, including Mexico, Jamaica and Indonesia.

Lauderdale-by-the-Sea is known as one of the best spots for beach diving because the reefs are accessible from shore.

March 11th, 2009 | Author:

Welcome to the new website supporting development of a Gulf and Sound side Snorkeling and Diving Reefs at Navarre Beach Florida.

The Artificial Marine Reefs will provide exciting recreation and educational opportunities for our local community and visitors.

If you are interested in helping please contact us.  The Navarre Beach Marine Sanctuary Committee is a non profit organization and a committee of the Navarre Beach Area Chamber of Commerce.  We encourage all people who are interested in this new project to contact us for more information or just come on out to our next meeting.

The Marine Sanctuary Committee would like to thank Kenny Wilder and Brad Riley for their help in getting our new site up and running!!